Alright, I managed to fix the major kinks in the word-wrapping system, so there shouldn't be problems of line-breaks happening in the middle of a word anymore.

I'm also looking into translating the game's gui/interface, but for that I need someone who's able to use photo editing software. Anybody willing to help out?

Edit: Nevermind, we've got photo editing covered now.
Huh interesting project.

Curious if you plan to tackle other eroge with MC elements like Justice Blade. Either way, good luck.
Hi Fallingdown,

Is this project being continued? And do you have a Patreon?

I would give support on patreon for a project of this scale.
Mario3406 said:
Hi Fallingdown,

Is this project being continued? And do you have a Patreon?

I would give support on patreon for a project of this scale.
Hey there,

Yeah, this project is still being continued. I suppose this would be a good time to give an update on some things. I'll edit the first post to talk about them.

I'm not too sure about running a patreon yet. I would need to ask the other members about it. But before that though, I would need a gauge of how many people would be willing to become a donor.

Also, you created a new thread where you asked another question, so I'll answer that here. I have some very basic knowledge of Japanese, and using that, I was able to figure out/estimate/guesstimate the meaning of each sentence using a program called Translation Aggregator. The program takes text and puts it through multiple translation services like Google Translate, but most notably Jparser/Mecab, which are Japanese dictionaries similar to Rikaichamp. They're pretty powerful dictionaries and can even catch many Japanese idioms/figures of speech that would otherwise be confusing if translated directly. I rely mainly on those dictionaries, but I do often take a look at what Google Translate spits out for reference.
Okay thank you!

If you start a patreon I would support you!!!

Thanks a lot for the quick response.
If you take money for it, you are going from grey into illegal territory.

Staffing (the developer) could interprete it as some kind of making money with their work. Even just taking money for advertisements on a site that advertises the project has in the past been deemed making money of another companies copyright.

It's not like they couldn't cease and desist you anyway if they want to, but asking for money in any way when you are tinkering with copyrighted work is one level above and many companies file for a rather ridiculous amount of money if someone even makes 10 dollars of their work.

I also doubt you would get any substantial amount of money, so my advice would be to not do it. The risk is not worth having maybe 200-300 dollars of donation.
HypnoMangaEditor said:
If you take money for it, you are going from grey into illegal territory.

Staffing (the developer) could interprete it as some kind of making money with their work. Even just taking money for advertisements on a site that advertises the project has in the past been deemed making money of another companies copyright.

It's not like they couldn't cease and desist you anyway if they want to, but asking for money in any way when you are tinkering with copyrighted work is one level above and many companies file for a rather ridiculous amount of money if someone even makes 10 dollars of their work.

I also doubt you would get any substantial amount of money, so my advice would be to not do it. The risk is not worth having maybe 200-300 dollars of donation.
As long as he doesn't distribute the game, and purely the translation, it shouldn't be a problem.
You think the script he is translating isn't copyrighted? It's part of the game so I doubt that argument would count that he isn't reselling the game.
HypnoMangaEditor said:
You think the script he is translating isn't copyrighted? It's part of the game so I doubt that argument would count that he isn't reselling the game.
I mean, people get paid to translate manga all the time...
Berne Convention, Article 8 said:

Right of Translation

Authors of literary and artistic works protected by this Convention shall enjoy the exclusive right of making and of authorizing the translation of their works throughout the term of protection of their rights in the original works.
Most places that haven't ratified the Berne Convention are generally terrible places to live by most standards (probably most relevantly that merely having the game itself may be illegal), so it's a pretty safe assumption even just translating it without payment is technically illegal. On a practical level, almost no one would care or even know you're doing it, though reactions have varied by producer.

Minori initially reacted very negatively to fan translations of their games but after talking realised "oh shit, is this an actual viable profit stream?" and quickly reversed their actions. Some companies just don't give a fuck, like Spike Chunsoft with Danganronpa where they just licensed it out to NISA who produced their own translation. Some companies may be leveraging the translations, as may be the case recently with Ninetail and the Venus Blood Chimera translation acting as a form of market research. age I believe also leveraged the existing translation for their release of Muv-Luv. Xuse just straight up released the existing translation of Aselia the Eternal IIRC. Doujin groups are usually just "cool, I have an international audience" if they're even aware of it.
AgaresOaks said:
Most places that haven't ratified the Berne Convention are generally terrible places to live by most standards (probably most relevantly that merely having the game itself may be illegal), so it's a pretty safe assumption even just translating it without payment is technically illegal. On a practical level, almost no one would care or even know you're doing it, though reactions have varied by producer.

Minori initially reacted very negatively to fan translations of their games but after talking realised "oh shit, is this an actual viable profit stream?" and quickly reversed their actions. Some companies just don't give a fuck, like Spike Chunsoft with Danganronpa where they just licensed it out to NISA who produced their own translation. Some companies may be leveraging the translations, as may be the case recently with Ninetail and the Venus Blood Chimera translation acting as a form of market research. age I believe also leveraged the existing translation for their release of Muv-Luv. Xuse just straight up released the existing translation of Aselia the Eternal IIRC. Doujin groups are usually just "cool, I have an international audience" if they're even aware of it.
Thanks guys, learned a lot here.
I think AgaresOaks pretty much said it all. They can shut you down any time anyway, but some companies get more active once you get some sort of income out of their stuff. I think it is more prevalent in the US, because copyright needs to be actively defended there to not lose it (so companies do not have a choice in some cases, even though they might get bad PR), but that doesn't mean a japanese company wouldn't sue.

It's a bit like all the anime we get to see online. I once asked a Mangaka at an anime convention (don't remember the name anymore, it was 20+ years ago), how he feels about Fansubs and anime appearing all over the world because of that. He clearly stated that it's something he considers not legal, however he also sees the impact that it can have on animation in the western world and their popularity. Back then 80% of the room did not even know what a Fansub was. Anime was distributed in IRC via bots and Bittorrent wasn't even a thing yet, and of course, streaming services weren't either.

In the end, it's risky, but your choice if you want to do it. I think there has been a good amount of what could happen and the choices of it happening. It's always nice to get paid for something you love doing but I also think that people who joined your team would do it for the community even without getting paid.

Mindwipe said:
I mean, people get paid to translate manga all the time...
I think that commissioned work is different from crowdfunding simply on the scale of getting people involved. What is dangerous is the publish part and with crowdfunding you publish it right off the bat. No one's ever going to sue you if you have a manga translated just for yourself. Not that most mangaka do care, but some have put their copyright warning on the first page of their manga - so them and/or their managers differ in how they see and may approach this.
Saimin Yuugi received some kind of artistic prize back when it came out, so staffing might be more protective. They might be talking to some company to release it in the west as we speak (I highly doubt that) or they may not care at all. Yep, we are probably overthinking this here, there are much bigger fish to fry, but the thing is, he is taking a risk that could cost him, so it's better to inform him now, than to have him come back for a patreon to get the lawyer costs crowdfunded.
HypnoMangaEditor said:
I think it is more prevalent in the US, because copyright needs to be actively defended there to not lose it (so companies do not have a choice in some cases, even though they might get bad PR), but that doesn't mean a japanese company wouldn't sue.
Copyright does not need to be actively defended in any Berne Convention country.

Berne Convention, Article 5 said:

Rights Guaranteed

(2) The enjoyment and the exercise of these rights shall not be subject to any formality
In the US, trademark must be actively defended, but that just covers your brand name. A translation typically only carries the original or translated branding, which causes no confusion as to the origin of the product. (that is, you haven't branded a VN you made "Saimin Yuugi" or claimed it's in the franchise)

However, Japanese companies ARE more likely to sue because of a lack of understanding of the law because it turns out if your lawyer spent a lot of time learning enough Japanese to talk to you he probably knows less about the law. We saw this recently when Atlus DMCAed a PS3 emulator. They probably thought "we're smart, we'll shut this down by suing them over our copyrighted material, why did no one think of this before?!" Problem was, someone thought of this before. That someone being Sony. And the thing they were defending was the entirety of the PSX and all screenshots of every game on the PSX.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/copyright/cases/Sony_v_Bleem.htm

(that's just the appeal for the screenshots, though in paragraph 11 they note that Sony failed every other claim they brought against Bleem)

It should be noted though Sony lost in a legal sense, they won since the legal fees bankrupted Bleem. Though don't think that just lets companies do that all the time. They have to actually come up with new arguments for which they can sue or face anti-SLAPP laws. And that result also forced every console maker to re-design their consoles so they'd be harder to get working without violating copyright.